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Mason & Dixon

One. Latitudes and Departures

Table of Contents for pp. 3-253

Chapter 1 (6-11) : 6-10
Snow-Balls have flown their Arcs, starr'd the Sides of Outbuildings, as of Cousins, carried Hats away into the brisk Wind off Delaware
1.2 : 10-11
Tho' my Inclination had been to go out aboard an East Indiaman (the Revd continues)
Chapter 2 (12-13) : 12-13
To Mr. Mason, Assistant to the Astronomer Royal, At Greenwich
Chapter 3 (14-29) : 14-29
I was not there when they met —or, not in the usual Way.
3.2 : 31-34
"He wants whah'?"
Chapter 4 (30-41) : 30-31
Had it proved of any help that the Revd had tried to follow the advise of Epictetus
4.3 : 34-37
As they proceed down the Channel
4.4 : 37-38
"'Twas small work to come up with us, get to leeward
4.5 : 38-41
Altho' Dixon is heading off to Sumatra with a member of the Church of England,- that is, the Ancestor of Troubles,—
Chapter 5 (42-46) : 42-46
If ever they meant to break up the Partnership, this would've been the time.
Chapter 6 (47-57) : 47-48
"The Interdiction at Sea, it seems to the Revd, "was` patently a warning to the Astronomers, from Beyond.
6.2 : 48-54
So off we sail again (the Revd continues), this time in convoy with another, larger Frigate
6.3 : 54-56
"Cheerly. Cheerly, then, Lads..."
6.4 : 56-57
"Why?" the Twins wish to know.
6.5 : 57-57
On Southward the Seahorse gallops
Chapter 7 (58-76) : 58-59
Trying to remember how they ever came to this place, both speak of Passage as by a kind of Flight
7.2 : 60-75
Although rooming at the Zeemann's, the Astronomers are soon eating at the house behind
7.3 : 75-76
"Even by then," the Revd declares, "upon some Topicks, the Astronomers remain'd innocent.
Chapter 8 (77-86) : 77-86
As the Days here slip by, whilst the Transit yet lies to distant for him quite to believe in, Dixon
Chapter 9 (87-93) : 87-93
Despite all wish to avoid it, here they are, Vrou Vroom and Mason, in an upper Bedroom,
Chapter 10 (94-104) : 94-96
As Planets do the Sun, we orbit 'round God according to Laws as elegant as Kepler's.
10.2 : 96-102
Somebody, somewhere in the World, watching the Planet go dark against the Sun,- dark, mad, mortal,
10.3 : 102-102
When they leave the Cape, no one is there at the Quay to say good-bye but Bonk
10.4 : 102-104
"What made them leave home and set sail upon dangerous seas,
Chapter 11 (105-115) : 105-106
"The St. Helena of old had been a Paradise," avers Euphrenia.
11.2 : 106-110
The idea, in making Port at St. Helena, is to keep to windward,
11.3 : 110-110
The year after Rebekah's dead was treacherous ground for Mason,
11.4 : 110-114
'Twas then that Mason began his Practice, each Friday, of going out to the hangings at Tyburn
11.5 : 114-115
"You did have me going, Florinda."
Chapter 12 (116-124) : 116-124
Mason, Dixon, and Maskelyne are in a punch house on Cock Hill called "The Moon"
Chapter 13 (125-145) : 125-145
Intent upon picking his way back over the wet Rocks to the Sea-Steps,
Chapter 14 (146-157) : 147-157
Mason, up on the Ridge, finds himself wondering about Dixon
Chapter 15 (158-166) : 158-163
Mason, convinc'd that he has been set upon a Pelgrimage by Forces beyond his ability at present to reach,-
15.2 : 163-166
And here it is, upon the Windward Side, where no ship ever comes willingly, that her visits begin.
Chapter 16 (167-174) : 167-174
Here is what Mason tells Dixon of how Rebekah and he first met.
Chapter 17 (175-182) : 175-182
Once 'round Castle Rock and the Needles,
Chapter 18 (183-189) : 183-184
Void of Course, back with Senses Boggl'd from War, Slavery, Succesful Obs, the wind at St. Helena
18.2 : 184-189
However content Rebekah may be, Mason's Sisters are unusually harsh in their treatment with him.
Chapter 19 (190-198) : 190-198
In the bar of The George, what should he find, as the Topick of vehement Conversation, but Bradley again.
Chapter 20 (199-206) : 199-204
The Boys circle about, not sure of him, tho 'Doc has come running,
20.2 : 204-206
In fact, far from the Ogre or Troll his son makes him out to be, Charles Sr. is a wistful and spiritual person.
Chapter 21 (207-214) : 207-208
The towns around the Golden Valley didn't think much of one another
21.2 : 208-212
They found a Hill-Top and pick-nick'd.
21.3 : 212-214
London is chang'd.
Chapter 22 (215-227) : 215-216
Fr. Christopher Maire, far from pallid, wearing no black beyond his Queue-Tie,
22.2 : 216-218
"In Paris," comments Cousin DePugh,
22.3 : 218-227
Most of Hurworth (the Revd has meanwhile continu'd) believe William Emerson a practicing Magician.
Chapter 23 (228-237) : 228-237
Indeed, one look at the place is enough to reconcile Fr. Maire to the possibility of having to leave it.
Chapter 24 (238-245) : 238-231
The most metaphysickal thing Mason will ever remember Dixon saying is, "I owe my existence to a pair of Shoes."
24.2 : 241-245
His father died when Jeremiah was twenty-two,
Chapter 25 (246-254) : 246-246
Miss Tenebrae, perplex'd, puts down her Embroidery.
25.2 : 246-253
The days before their Departure are Humid, splash'd into repeatedly by Rain.